Part of Kamlang Reserved Forests under Lohit District was declared as a Wildlife Sanctuary covering an area of 783 sq km in the north eastern state of Arunachal Pradesh in India. The forest area at Kamalang is rich with greenery and wildlife. The wildlife that can be seen in the Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary are hoolock gibbon, tiger, leopard, capped langur, red panda, takin and lots more. The vegetation also presents some rare variety of plantations found only in Arunachal Pradesh India.

Kamlang gets its name from the Kamlang River, which cuts east-west through the sanctuary before joining the Brahmaputra to the west of the sanctuary. The elevation in the sanctuary ranges from less than 500 m to a lofty 4500 m above sea level. The highest peak, part of the Dapha Bum ridge is in the south-east of the sanctuary, bordering Namdapha. The area is rugged and mountainous with a few gentle slopes crisscrossed by numerous rivers (Lai, Lati, Lang and Kamlang), rivulets and perennial streams.

Flora and Fauna:
The general vegetation of Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary is very similar to the adjoining Namdapha National Park. Like Namdapha, Kamlang also covers a phenomenal elevation gradient and harbors a wide array of habitat types from dense foothill evergreen forests to windswept alpine meadows at the highest elevations. The foothill forests of Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary along with Namdapha National Park are the last remaining dipterocarp forests in the state, and are probably among the most extensive patches of this habitat in the area. The foothill forests are dominated by tree species such as Dipterocarpus macrocarpus, Shorea assamica, Terminalia myriocarpa and Altingia excelsa, among others. There is a clear transition of the tropical evergreen forests to subtropical and temperate forests along the elevational gradient. Just below the treeline are the stunted rhododendron shrubberies.

Along the slopes of the Kamlang river valley, bamboo and cane breaks are common. Most of the area near the scenic Glao Lake is dominated by secondary vegetation, possibly because of prior shifting cultivation by the Miju Mishmi tribe in the area.

The vegetation in Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary is poorly documented. However, with around 1000 species of plants having been found so far in the neighboring Namdapha National Park, one can expect comparable numbers even in Kamlang, as well as yet undiscovered species, especially from the higher reaches. In the foothill forests two major dipterocarp tree species dominate the tree life – Dipterocarpus macrocarpus and Shorea assamica. Knowledge of the plant species from the higher areas is poor. There are more than 50 species of orchids including endemic species like Eria kamlangensis and Oberonia kamlangensis.

Information on faunal groups is also poor, as no systematic surveys have been carried out in the area. Avifaunal diversity needs to be systematically documented, but is likely to be extremely rich, and the lack of exploration in most parts of Kamlang might mean that there are species yet to be discovered. There are unpublished records of Smew, a small duck, from Glao Lake. Rufous-necked Hornbills are common and Wreathed Hornbills visit the park during winters. The lower reaches also harbour the Great Hornbill (Buceros bicornis), the range-restricted Brown Hornbill and the Oriental Pied Hornbill. Amongst mammals, Hoolock gibbons, the only apes found in India, are common in the area; other primates like capped langur, Assamese macaque, stump-tailed macaque can be seen occasionally. Barking deer, sambar and serow are present in the area and the local people claim that there are reasonable numbers of takin and musk deer in the higher reaches. Amongst wild cats, there are leopard cat, fishing cat, golden cat, marbled cat, clouded leopard, and leopard .

Major Wildlife Attractions: Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary
There are unpublished records of Smew, a small duck, from Glao Lake. Rufous-necked Hornbills are common and Wreathed Hornbills visit the park during winters. The lower reaches also harbour the Great Hornbill, the range-restricted Brown Hornbill and the Oriental Pied Hornbill. Amongst mammals, Hoolock gibbons, the only apes found in India, are common in the area; other primates like capped langur, Assamese macaque, stump-tailed macaque can be seen occasionally. Barking deer, sambar and serow are present in the area and the local people claim that there are reasonable numbers of takin and musk deer in the higher reaches. Amongst wild cats, there are leopard cat, fishing cat, golden cat, marbled cat, clouded leopard, tiger, and leopard.

Best Time to Visit: Kamlang Wildlife Sanctuary
The best time to visit the wildlife is between the months of October to April.

How to Get there:
Road: Several buses are available from Tezu and Tinsukia (Assam) to reach the sanctuary. Wakro is connected to Namsai and Tezu by Bus and taxi services thereby can proceed to Tinsukia / Dibrugarh.

Rail: Nearest Railway station is at Tinsukia ( Assam ) about 135 km from Tezu (Arunachal). One can easily reach the sanctuary from here by road.

Air: Dibrugarh is the nearest Airport which has regular flight connection to New Delhi and Kolkata by Indian Airlines, Jet Airways and Sahara Airways. Pawan Hans Helicopter Service connects both Tezu and Namsai to Itanagar. Airports / Helipads are available at Tezu about 4 km from Tezu (Arunachal). One can easily reach the sanctuary from here.

General Info / Tips:
Good accommodation is available near the sanctuary for the tourists coming to the sanctuary. There are several Tourist lodge, circuit house, hotel near the sanctuary for the tourists from all over the world. PWD Rest House is also another place of stay near the sanctuary.

Location:
Arunanchal Pradesh, India

Nearest Access:
Tezu (43 kms.)

Wildlife Found:
Tiger, Leopard, Hornbill

Coverage Area:
783-sq-kms